News

Tenn. school district's tech policy violates constitutional rights, civil liberties groups say

A public school district is under scrutiny for a "fundamental misunderstanding" of students' constitutional rights by overly restricting what they can do with technology and the Internet, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the American Civil Liberties Union.

Calif. patrol officers steal, share nude photos from female suspects' cellphones, warrant states

A years-long "game" of stealing and trading nude photos from suspects' cell phones has come to an end for several California Highway Patrol (CHP) officers, who have been accused of misconduct.

New Android-based mobile app lets Army soldiers SWET water needs

The Army will be fielding a smartphone app to help soldiers better determine their drinking water needs so they can carry just enough to stay hydrated.

Options for law enforcement to get around smartphone data encryption

Several options may be available to law enforcement officials concerned that recent actions by companies to protect and encrypt data on smartphones and other mobile devices could impact their investigations, according to a recent Congressional Research Service brief.

Mobile app exploits Chilean public transit payment system

The Chilean government has blocked some 18,000 public transportation cards after detecting that transit users fraudulently added money to the cards with an Android-based application.

More Americans use mobile for previously PC-based tasks, report finds

Americans are turning more frequently to mobile devices to perform activities they used to rely on desktop and laptop computers for, according to a new report.

FCC needs to do more work on text-to-911, trade group says

A Federal Communications Commission proposal to make it easier for people to text emergencies to 911 call centers earned support from the Telecommunications Industry Association, but also warnings.

How two US agencies used responsive web design to improve mobile access to content

Two agencies – the Energy Department and the Defense Finance and Accounting Service, or DFAS – recently presented a webinar showcasing their efforts in implementing a responsive web design and the difficulties they faced.

Are you safe during a disaster? New Facebook tool finds out and lets friends know

When the "Safety Check" tool is activated, Facebook will send a push notification asking users in an affected area about their status. It will know where users are depending on the city listed in their profile, their last location if indicated and the city where they're using the Internet.

Guidelines aim to prevent overloading of mobile networks

As applications and devices associated with the "Internet of Things" grow, they threaten to overload mobile networks. New guidelines offer methods to make sure that doesn't happen.

Feds set up fake Facebook account using arrested woman's cellphone photos, DOJ rethinking practice

The Justice Department said it will review whether a Drug Enforcement Administration agent went too far when he used photographs and other personal information taken from a woman's cell phone to set up a fake Facebook account as part of an investigation.

FCC proposes changes to small business competitive bidding

Proposed changes to the Federal Communications Commission's competitive bidding rules would facilitate small businesses' chances to participate, according to a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

Franken urges DOJ to step up enforcement against mobile stalking apps

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), who has championed legislation to ban mobile apps that enable one person to spy on or stalk another, is urging the Justice Department to step up its efforts against such technology.

State Department takes internal networking, microblogging mobile

The State Department unveiled to its workforce Oct. 3 a mobile version of Corridor, the department's internal networking and microblogging tool. The move to help foreign affairs professionals better connect and collaborate via mobile is the latest step in what Eric Nelson, director of the State Department's office of eDiplomacy, describes as a march toward greater access to the department's information assets from mobile devices.

State Department tries to balance security with mobile access

The State Department is trying to satisfy demands for instantaneous mobile communications in every setting and provide more access to classified and sensitive networks at its facilities – priorities that can be at odds and impossible to do all the time, said a high-ranking departmental official.

White House officials propose spectrum allocation strategies

As wireless applications continue to multiply and make a mark on the economy, policy approaches to managing spectrum become more necessary, experts said. "I think we need to pursue a four-part strategy when it comes to spectrum," said Jason Furman, chairman of the President's Council on Economic Advisers.

ICE expands, enhances mobile app for public to help identify, find child predators

Federal law enforcement officials are releasing an enhanced version of a mobile app that they say will significantly expand the public's help in nabbing child predators and rescuing victims.

FCC helps TV broadcasters do their homework on incentive auction

As a way to better educate TV broadcasters about next year's spectrum auction, federal regulators said they've sent out information packages that explain the auction process, bidding options, compensation estimates and tax implications.

FBI keeps police mum on use of cellphone trackers

Police use of a device that lets officers zero in on the location of cellphones – and thereby persons of interest or suspects – is being kept under wraps by the FBI, according to a document released last month through a Freedom of Information Act request.

FCC proposal would give unlicensed users space in TV spectrum

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed to change rules that permit devices to operate on unused portions of the TV broadcast spectrum.