Mobile procurement vehicle, guidance delayed

Tools


Nov. 23 wasn't just the most infamous shopping day of the year; the date also marked 6 months since the Office of Management and Budget unveiled its Digital Government Strategy. And with that milestone came a slew of missed deadlines from groups like the Federal CIO Council and agencies such as the General Services Administration.

One GSA-"owned" deliverable agencies were no doubt looking forward to seeing was the requirement that GSA establish a governmentwide contract vehicle for mobile devices and wireless services.

But it looks like agencies may have to wait a bit longer--at least until early 2013.

Even if GSA did have this contract vehicle ready to go, the agency likely won't make any major announcements until OMB is ready to unveil the administration's work on the other 6-month milestones, according to a GSA spokesperson.

Meanwhile, Federal Chief Information Officer Steven VanRoekel said OMB won't make an announcement on its governmentwide open data policy, which was due Nov. 23, until early 2013.

It's not just GSA and OMB, though. Several other, mobile-related requirements were due at the 6-month mark. Agencies were required to develop an enterprisewide inventory of mobile devices and wireless service contracts. And a White House advisory group and the Federal CIO Council were to evaluate opportunities to accelerate the secure adoption of mobile technologies into the federal environment at reduced cost.

In all, the Digital Government Strategy is a 12-month plan. So, there is still plenty of time to make up ground on the most-recently missed deadlines. What's more, agencies performed very well in meeting their 3-month deadlines.

However, OMB does have a less-than-stellar track record when it comes to launching strategies and delivering on them. One can't help but worry that congressional testimony or a White House blog post 18 months down the road will reveal that the actual objective of the Digital Government Strategy was to "shock the system" rather than actually get anything done. - Molly